March Blog is here, enjoy!

Friday Mar 20th, 2020

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Hello!

Has this ever happened to you? You’re looking for a contractor or other professional for a home project or repair. You search on Google and find hundreds of names. You spend hours considering them. Yet, you never feel confident that the people you find will be qualified, experienced and reputable.

That’s not an unusual scenario. In the end, most people email a friend or neighbour, and ask, “Do you know a good contractor?”

Often that approach works best!

In fact, a growing number of my clients come my way by referral too. I deeply appreciate all those people who recommend me to their friends and neighbours.

So, I’d like to return the favour.

You see, I’m well-connected in the local “home industry”. If you’re looking for someone - a contractor, a repair person, a landscape company, etc. - please give me a call. I may be able to recommend someone to you.

 

Should You Worry About Market Fluctuations?

 
 
 
You turn on the television and watch a news story about housing prices going down. Then you read an article about the housing market on the upswing again.

It’s a little like being on a roller-coaster ride!

Unfortunately, the ride isn’t much fun if you’re thinking of buying or selling a home. In fact, it can be very confusing and frustrating. You just don’t know if “now” is the right time to make a move.

In reality, the housing market has been fluctuating for decades. Yet, people sell their homes every day for good prices, and just as many people get into their next dream home affordably.

When you hear news of market fluctuations, there are two important things to consider.

First, a lot of media information about the housing market is national, or at least regional. If the housing market is trending up or down nationally, remember that it doesn’t necessarily mean that your LOCAL market is doing the same. In fact, it’s entirely possible for housing prices to be rising in your neighbourhood, while they are falling nationally, and vice versa.

Second, if you’re selling your current property while buying another home, then the net effect of market fluctuations may cancel out. Say, for example, that the local market is on the upswing. You’ll probably be able to sell your current home for a good price. However, the home you purchase will likely also be priced to reflect the upswing. The same holds true when the market is down.

All that being said, there are some circumstances in which you need to consider market fluctuations when deciding whether or not to make a move. Call today for more information.

 

Moisture on Windows

 
 
 
You’re standing by your window admiring the view. Then you notice it. Moisture has built up around the edges of the glass. Should you worry?

It all depends on the reason for the build up.

Assuming you have traditional double-pane glass in your windows, there are a few things to look for if you notice moisture.

Often, moisture at the bottom of your windows is simply caused by too much humidity in your indoor air. If that’s the case, simply adjust your humidifier.

If the moisture is on the outside of the window, typically there’s also no problem with the window itself. It may have rained recently, or the outside humidity may have spiked causing the accumulation. Generally, there’s no reason for concern.

However, if the moisture is in between the two panes of glass, the seal has broken and surrounding air - along with its water content - has made its way in. This disrupts the thermal barrier of the window, reducing its energy efficiency. In fact, the glass might feel noticeably colder than your other windows on chilly days. In that case, you’ll need to replace the pane.

Similarly, if the moisture is coming in through only one spot - the bottom right corner for example - then you might have a leak. If you have a wood frame or sill, you may also notice a growing water stain. It’s important to get leaks fixed quickly. There may be water damage occurring within the frame that you cannot see.

 

Home Shopping and the Four-Legged Stool

 
 
 
What kind of stool is most likely to keep you from toppling over when you sit on it? Of course, two-legged stools won’t even stand on their own. Three-legged stools are okay, but still unstable. Four-legged stools are rock solid.

What does this have to do with shopping for a new home?

Well, if you want to find the right home quickly and for the best price, you need to have four things in place - the four legs of the stool. They will help ensure the experience goes smoothly.

The first leg is your wish list. You need to have a clear picture of the type of home you want. How many bedrooms? A large deck? Don’t forget about the neighbourhood. Do you need to be close to major highways for ease of commuting?

The second leg is a pre-approved mortgage. Getting the financing handled upfront takes the guesswork out of what you can afford. And, sellers are more likely to take any offers you make more seriously.

The third leg is realistic expectations. Of homes that sell, 99% sell at or near their current market values. That doesn’t mean you can’t find a good deal. It does mean you’re unlikely to find a “steal”. Fortunately, there are likely several wonderful properties available within your price range.

The final leg of the stool is a great real estate professional. Choosing the right real estate professional is crucial to making your home shopping experience less stressful and more productive.

So, when you’re hunting for a new home, make sure you start with a stable “four-legged stool”. It will dramatically increase your chances of finding a home that fits your needs and budget.

Need help with that? Call today.

 

Notable, Quotable, Quotes!

“If you want to travel fast, go alone. If you want to travel far, go together.”
Chinese proverb

“Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.”
Vince Lombardi

“There are two ways of spreading light: be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.”
Edith Wharton

 

Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contract.
 

 

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